Week 13

John Virtue, born in 1947, is an English artist who specialises in monochrome landscapes. He is honorary Professor of Fine Art at the University of Plymouth, and from 2003–2005 was the sixth Associate Artist at London’s National Gallery.   He was educated at Slade.  Wikipedia  Mentioned by Katie Sollohub (who works with Emily Ball at Seawhites).

http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://ichef.bbci.co.uk/arts/yourpaintings/images/paintings/gac/624×544/gac_gac_17850_624x544.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/yourpaintings/artists/john-virtue&h=224&w=225&tbnid=rlrW1wmZo6nTvM:&zoom=1&tbnh=186&tbnw=186&usg=__E—nZOyfow4BGGo1mQMMNF9Nq4=&docid=tL615zMIgoex1M&itg=1&ved=0CH4Qyjc&ei=kNKOVLy0HZGv7Abr54HgBA

He sees colour as “unnecessary distraction”.[1] He uses shellac black ink and white paint.

  1. Haymarket Hotel, London NW1, Rupert Wright, The Times, 19 May 2007
    Robert Ryman, born 1930,  is an American painter identified with the movements of monochrome painting, minimalism, and conceptual art. He is best known for abstract, white-on-white paintings. He lives and works in New York. Wikipedia

    From the Tate web site http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/ryman-guild-t07147

‘Ryman’s work is an exploration of the fundamental elements of painting: support, paint, brushstroke and the relationship to the wall. Colour is eliminated in order to focus more clearly on these. This painting is one of a group of paintings Ryman made during 1982-3 that are constructions which incorporate fibreglass panels and aluminium brackets. Ryman used enamel paint in these works because it appears translucent when applied to fibreglass. In 1976 Ryman began to integrate external wall fasteners into the composition of his works. In ‘Guild’, the aluminium brackets are a structural part of the painting. They function as a bridge between the painting and its supporting wall, thereby expanding the visual territory of the painting to include the space in which it is shown.’

Guild   https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=robert+ryman+tate&espv=2&biw=1366&bih=643&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=mNOOVIyZOtLY7Aao5ICwAQ&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ#tbm=isch&q=bbc+robert+ryman+paintings&facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=PdbyY_AAL7ARBM%253A%3BkJvP6g50enwqeM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fichef.bbci.co.uk%252Farts%252Fyourpaintings%252Fimages%252Fpaintings%252Ftate%252F624x544%252Ftate_tate_t07147_10_624x544.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.bbc.co.uk%252Farts%252Fyourpaintings%252Fartists%252Fryman-robert-b-1930%3B515%3B544

Pecha kucha

Our presentation of 20 slides each displayed for 20 seconds is to be about what inspires me.  Easy.  Then I started to consider that question in detail.  Not so easy.

My natural inclination is to colour.  Something, could be real, could be a photo, flowers, sunlight, view, shadow, person, building, pattern, but principally colour.  Once I have connected with the image, play some stimulating music, rock or classical, and I can lose myself, only re-emerging when the work is speaking to me.

That was then, when I painted purely to please myself, mindful that the work would be for domestic consumption.  Now I am not so sure.

What I produce will always be to please me.  No commissions, no health threatening pressure.  But where the work is to be seen and by whom, may be changing.  If I am heading for a bigger stage, which I have to believe I am, it is after all why I am doing an MA, then where is that stage, who are those viewers?  Small, domestic pieces don’t seem to fit, so what will it be, what form will it take and just what do I fill 20 slides with?

Priscillajones.wordpress.com wire sculptures with fabric paper and wax.

Guardian Readers top 10 Books of the Year

Readers' top books

Six of the best… readers’ favourites in no particular order

A Dance in the Hurricane of Paper  – TED

A slow start but I stuck with it, in the belief that it wouldn’t be on TED if it wasn’t worth it.  I wasn’t disappointed.  Extraordinary!

Ansel Krut – 2010 Artist Interviews

Valerie Jolly – 2010 Artist Interviews

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